Book review: Evicted by Matthew Desmond

Evicted is a non-fiction, ethnographic look at housing in Wisconsin for  low income families.  The author followed several families as they navigated different housing situations.

The main argument of the book is that we need more affordable housing.  Desmond makes the argument that housing should be a right to which all Americans are entitled.  The general rule of thumb is that less than 30% of total net income should be spent on housing.  However, many people, not just low-income families, spend more than 30% of their income on housing (according to Bloomberg) because the cost of housing has outpaced income.  Amongst lower income families, the percentage spent on housing is generally much higher.

The book was well-written and presented what I thought was a fair accounting of both sides of the housing problem.  On the one hand, people faced eviction due to circumstances outside of their control such as losing a job, unexpected expenses such as a death in the family, illness, etc.  On the other hand, there are times when they were evicted due to their poor judgment and behavior (drug use, arguments/fights, not discussing or trying to work out a payment plan with the landlord, etc.).  Compounding their problem was their inaccessibility to decent housing, including: searching for housing on foot (no access to the Internet or a car to search for housing or not knowing how use the Internet to search for housing), landlords who are prejudiced about renting to minorities, landlords who refuse to rent to families with children, and limited income.

I had to stop reading this book for a while because I got so upset by it.  I was upset at the cycles of eviction for the people in this book.  I was angry at the landlords who wouldn’t fix their properties so that basic needs such as running water or plumbing were met.  I was angry at some of the poor decisions that were made (struggling to provide food and pay rent, yet having money for pot, cigarettes, and sometimes drugs).  I was angry at the number of companies that cut back on expenses by hiring people part-time so that they don’t have to cover benefits.  Most of all, the children’s situation upset me.  Not only didn’t they have time to make friends, they fell farther and farther behind in their education as they were moved around.

At the end of the book, the author presented some possible solutions to the housing problem.  The solution that was presented in the best light was using universal housing vouchers.  He described how universal housing vouchers had been used in other countries successfully.

Don’t skip the epilogue and the section called “about this project.”

Disclaimer: Thanks, Santa, for giving me this book for Christmas.  🙂

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